Review: Moji 360 Massager

first_imgI feel like I can safely say that most everyone who reads Blue Ridge Outdoors Magazine probably has a few aches and pains. We spend quite a few days on the trail, riding our bikes, running, and more, so our muscles really take a beating. This is why I was pretty excited to have the new Moji 360 Massager arrive on my doorstep.Moji specializes in keeping people active and pain free. They offer a variety of products all aimed at muscle recovery such as massagers, heat packs, and ice packs. The 360 Massager is their take on a do it all type of massager that can be used on legs, neck, back, and more. As you can see in the video the massager is a good size and with the multiple steel ball sizes you can really work the kinks out.I have been using this before and after rides pretty religiously. You can really go to town without a fear of the Moji breaking or failing. I feel more comfortable on my bike than before using the Moji, and it really helps me loosen up after long rides. I haven’t just been using the Moji after workouts though. I have started working the Moji into my everyday lifestyle. So much so that it sits under my coffee table within easy reach. Much of my time is spent at a desk so after a long day in the office it really helps with my lower back pain. I also find the smaller balls work great for neck pain as well!If you’re looking for an affordable solution to those aches and pains I would start with the Moji. At $50 it’s fairly priced and the construction is really high quality. A lot of my cycling friends have used it and I haven’t heard a complaint yet. If you want a better idea of the 360 be sure to watch the video below!$49.95; gomoji.comlast_img read more

Dutch sperm bank boss is ‘father to dozens’

first_imgStuff co.nz 13 May 2017Family First Comment: Disturbing aspect – and ultimately it’s the children who lose out #biologicalfathersmatterThe head of a Dutch fertility clinic is accused of using his own sperm and not that of selected donors to father dozens of children.Twenty three parents and children of those born through IVF treatment at Bijdorp medical centre, in Rotterdam, have gone to court to ask for DNA tests on Jan Karbaat, who died aged 89 last month. Karbaat, who ran one of the country’s largest sperm banks in the 80s and 90s, billed himself as “a pioneer in the field of fertilisation”.But reports began to emerge last year that suggested he may have been fathering the children he helped to conceive.Women who used the clinic report being told by Karbaat that he was fetching “fresh seed” from a room next to the insemination area.They say there are strong similarities between Karbaat and their children – including genetic features such as eye colour – that don’t match with their official donor’s characteristics. Karbaat reportedly admitted to having fathered about 60 children at the clinic, which closed in 2009 amid reports of irregularities, and requested in his will that no DNA tests be carried out on him post mortem.“They say it feels like they were raped by Karbaat,” Tim Bueters, the lawyer for the families, told newspaper Algemeen Dagblad.READ MORE: http://www.stuff.co.nz/world/europe/92546479/Dutch-sperm-bank-boss-is-father-to-dozens?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=twitterKeep up with family issues in NZ. Receive our weekly emails direct to your Inbox.last_img read more

Alexander: Kawhi Leonard returns in triumph to San Diego State

first_imgPreviousSan Diego State forward Yanni Wetzell (5) srambles for a loose ball with Utah State center Trevin Dorius (32) during the first half of an NCAA college basketball game Saturday, Feb. 1, 2020, in San Diego. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)Former San Diego State forward Kawhi Leonard, center right, now with the Los Angeles Clippers, poses with family members and Clippers players, among others, after his No. 15 jersey was retired during a halftime ceremony at San Diego State’s NCAA college basketball game against Utah State, Saturday, Feb. 1, 2020, in San Diego. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)San Diego State guard KJ Feagin (10) shoots as Utah State guard Abel Porter (15) defends during the first half of an NCAA college basketball game Saturday, Feb. 1, 2020, in San Diego. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull) SoundThe gallery will resume insecondsFormer San Diego State forward Kawhi Leonard, right, reacts alongside former San Diego State coach Steve Fisher as Leonard’s No 15 jersey is retired during a halftime ceremony in San Diego State’s NCAA college basketball game against Utah State, Saturday, Feb. 1, 2020, in San Diego. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)Former San Diego State forward Kawhi Leonard, center, looks up as his No. 15 jersey is retired during a halftime ceremony in San Diego State’s NCAA college basketball game against Utah State, Saturday, Feb. 1, 2020, in San Diego. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)Former San Diego State forward Kawhi Leonard, now with the Los Angeles Clippers, watches as his No. 15 jersey is retired during a halftime ceremony in San Diego State’s NCAA college basketball game against Utah State, Saturday, Feb. 1, 2020, in San Diego. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)Former San Diego State forward Kawhi Leonard, now with the Los Angeles Clippers, reacts during the first half of San Diego State’s NCAA college basketball game against Utah State on Saturday, Feb. 1, 2020, in San Diego. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)Former San Diego State forward Kawhi Leonard arrives during the first half of the team’s NCAA college basketball game against Utah State on Saturday, Feb. 1, 2020, in San Diego. Leonard’s jersey No. 15 was to be retired at halftime. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)A fan heads to her seat among replica jerseys in honor of former San Diego State basketball player Kawhi Leonard before San Diego State’s NCAA college basketball game against Utah State, Saturday, Feb. 1, 2020, in San Diego. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)San Diego State forward Yanni Wetzell (5) srambles for a loose ball with Utah State center Trevin Dorius (32) during the first half of an NCAA college basketball game Saturday, Feb. 1, 2020, in San Diego. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)Former San Diego State forward Kawhi Leonard, center right, now with the Los Angeles Clippers, poses with family members and Clippers players, among others, after his No. 15 jersey was retired during a halftime ceremony at San Diego State’s NCAA college basketball game against Utah State, Saturday, Feb. 1, 2020, in San Diego. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)NextShow Caption1 of 9Former San Diego State forward Kawhi Leonard, center right, now with the Los Angeles Clippers, poses with family members and Clippers players, among others, after his No. 15 jersey was retired during a halftime ceremony at San Diego State’s NCAA college basketball game against Utah State, Saturday, Feb. 1, 2020, in San Diego. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)ExpandSAN DIEGO — Even for the home of the No. 4 college basketball team in the country (according to both polls), or the No. 1 team (if you prefer the NCAA’s metrics), this was madness.The students who make up The Show, San Diego State’s rowdy student section, were in their seats an hour before game time, filling up the bulk of four full sections from top to bottom of Viejas Arena. They were there to see the undefeated Aztecs against Utah State, naturally, but the kid who wore a Riverside King High No. 22 jersey and held up the “Board Man Gets Paid” sign probably gave it away.This was Kawhi Leonard’s night at his alma mater. Given where the Aztecs are now, and how they became a destination program for a higher level of recruit after Leonard’s two seasons on Montezuma Mesa, the question isn’t about retiring his jersey – he wore No. 15 as a college player – but what took SDSU so long.Quite likely it was proximity. Those seasons in San Antonio and Toronto made it tough for the Aztecs to coordinate their schedule with the NBA calendar. With Leonard now a Clipper, clearing a date was comparatively simple. Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error Consider: Before Leonard the Aztecs were 163-40 under Fisher with two NCAA berths and three NIT trips. With Leonard they were 59-12 with two NCAA berths. In the eight-plus seasons since he left, counting the 22-0 record they’d compiled going into Saturday night, they’re 219-81, have reached the NCAAs five times and the NIT once and almost certainly will be playing in mid-March again this year.Also, the Aztecs had one player drafted in Fisher’s first decade as coach, Randy Holcomb as a second-round pick by San Antonio in 2002. After Leonard, the 15th player selected in the 2011 NBA draft, Jamaal Franklin, Xavier Thomas and Jalen McDaniels were second-rounders in 2013, ’14 and ’19, respectively.All of that should provide a sense of what Leonard meant to SDSU. What did SDSU mean to Leonard?“It just shows that hard work paid off,” he said Saturday afternoon. “I was able to reach that goal while I was there, to be able to become a pro.”He elaborated during the ceremony:“Coming here I wanted to make a name for myself,” he said. “I wanted to put San Diego State on the map. I want to thank the coaching staff, Coach Fisher, who recruited me hard. This is why I’m a player today. And a great group of teammates, trusting a freshman to pass me the ball. They wanted me to lead the team.”Leonard’s success is a reminder that recruiting can be incredibly hit or miss. Fisher and the Aztecs were in on him early when bigger programs were dubious about what position best suited him.Related Articles Kristaps Porzingis ruled out as Clippers, Mavericks set for Game 5; Follow for game updates Angels’ Shohei Ohtani spending downtime working in outfield Some of that hesitancy from other people, as current coach (and then assistant) Brian Dutcher recalled, might have involved Leonard’s famously reticent nature.“If you spend the time to build a relationship, you know he’s a quiet kid,” Dutcher said. “You know, if you go in there one time and try to recruit him (and) he doesn’t say anything, you leave and you say, ‘Well, the kid’s not interested in it. He didn’t say anything.’ But if you stick to it, you realize that’s his personality and you embrace it. You just say this is a rare kid that doesn’t boast about his game. He just plays his game. And he likes us. He likes the fact that we were there from the start.“I thought he was gonna be a great player. I called back and told Coach, ‘I think this kid’s got a chance to play in the NBA.’ But nowhere in your wildest dreams do you think he’s going to be the best player in the world.”Leonard committed to San Diego State before his senior year at King … and after he and his team took down a Mater Dei powerhouse in the CIF Southern Section final, Fisher and his staff worried that bigger programs would swoop in. But Leonard honored his commitment.So it made a peculiar sort of sense when that vibrant, raucous SDSU student section erupted in a loud ovation when Leonard walked into the arena 10 minutes into the first half … and then turned unusually quiet, almost as if it were a sacred moment.There was some symmetry this night. Another son of the Inland Empire, Matt Mitchell (Eastvale Roosevelt) led the charge from a 39-31 halftime deficit, scoring 24 of his 28 points in the second half including back-to-back-to-back three-pointers to put SDSU in front to stay.Yes, the idea of having a big night with Leonard on the premises hit home. Leonard’s influence on this program influenced Mitchell during his own recruitment process, after he’d committed to and then decommitted from Cal State Fullerton.“He’s the biggest idol next to Reggie Miller in the Inland Empire,” Mitchell said. “So it’s a great influence for me to come here and be able to show out tonight.”During the halftime ceremony, Fisher gestured toward the full house and said to Leonard: “This is your legacy, my friend. Look around this building.”And then the former coach got to the heart of what makes Kawhi Kawhi, the attribute that his coaching staff had no trouble embracing.“A lot of people talk a good game,” he said. “Kawhi doesn’t talk a good game. He plays a good game.”They saw it here first.center_img LAFC loses reigning MLS MVP Carlos Vela to knee injury UCLA football’s Jake Burton enters transfer portal with hopes of playing this fall Leonard put in his workday – 31 points, six rebounds in 23:34 of the Clips’ 118-106 afternoon victory over Minnesota at Staples Center – and then hustled down to San Diego with family, friends, his teammates – every last one of them – and other Clippers staff for a ceremony at halftime of what turned out to be the Aztecs’ 23rd straight victory, 80-68 over the Aggies.Then again, due to recent events, things aren’t that simple any more. Leonard, like the late Kobe Bryant, had taken to using helicopters to bypass Southern California traffic.This time, Leonard took a private plane.“It’s (because of) more people coming with me,” he told Mirjam Swanson of the Southern California News Group in Los Angeles after his game. “Things happened (with helicopters) before that; it’s just so famous because it’s Kobe Bryant. … A lot of my helicopter flights got canceled because of fog, so if it’s a clear day, then maybe yeah, I would take it. Just not at this particular point just because I have people with me.”It’s true that the Aztecs turned from doormat to respectable not too long after Steve Fisher arrived to coach them in 1999. But it was when Leonard arrived on campus in 2010, as a recruit that had been overlooked by the power conference schools until it was too late, that San Diego State took that next step. The Aztecs set a school record for victories (34-3) and reached the NCAA Sweet 16 in Leonard’s sophomore year, after which he turned pro. Clippers vs. Mavericks Game 5 playoff updates from NBA beat reporters last_img read more

Anthony Joshua’s aura gone for good in Andy Ruiz Jr. loss

first_imgAnthony Joshua took his New York humiliation under Andy Ruiz Jr.’s heavy fists very well, with customary class and good grace.After visiting the canvas four times inside seven rounds, a dream American debut at Madison Square Garden unraveling into an unforeseeable nightmare, the former IBF, WBA and WBO world heavyweight champion emerged for a delayed post-fight news conference with a smile and good manners. Despite everything, Joshua will enter any rematch as favorite, probably at a packed football stadium in the sort of mega event he incredibly made a staple of the sport in his homeland.Mandatory obligations mean Ruiz is likely to have to relinquish portions of his crown to face Joshua again, meaning the path to an undisputed champion — and the window of clarity that would give to the division — has probably closed for this generation.When it happens, that outing will feel so different to previous nights of delirium at Wembley and the Principality Stadium, where everything felt possible for a genuine superstar. Ruiz took that aura from Joshua and, unlike alphabet belts, you never get that back. Join DAZN and watch Gennadiy Golovkin vs. Steve Rolls on June 8″I’ve dealt with some real big losses in life and bounced back. I feel like this is just part of a journey that I’m on,” he said, having warmly embraced Ruiz in the ring afterwards.”This is boxing. What I have to do is re-evaluate the situation, make it better and go again. We didn’t come this far to stop, to fold under pressure. We came this far and I feel we can definitely go a lot further.”Unlike what unfolded for most of a stunning main event, it was classic Joshua. Talk of the “journey,” of boxing’s inextricable link to redemption stories. When the dust settles and the senses are unscrambled, it would be surprising if the 29-year-old remains so philosophically on-message.Your favorite fighters and motivational posters will tell you setbacks pave the way for comebacks. That might sometimes be true, but it is rarely the case of setbacks like the one Joshua suffered against Ruiz.This is Andy’s night, congratulations Champ 🇲🇽 pic.twitter.com/5gE8uFx4MG— Anthony Joshua (@anthonyfjoshua) June 2, 2019History tells us the 2012 Olympic champion’s career is now heading in a different direction to the one that signposted undisputed dominance.Ruiz’s victory is heavyweight boxing’s biggest upset since James “Buster” Douglas dethroned Mike Tyson in Tokyo in 1990. Like the then-undefeated Tyson, Joshua has been robbed of his fear factor.Vulnerability being laid bare in public — Joshua’s up-and-down thriller against Wladimir Klitschko two years ago means this type of defeat felt possible, if not against Ruiz — is not an insurmountable problem.Fellow Briton Lennox Lewis was sensationally stopped by both Oliver McCall and Hasim Rahman, responding to avenge those losses and regain his titles.Joshua is likely to have the same chance in a rematch against Ruiz in the UK before the end of this year, but the manner of his loss is more troubling than when Lewis was dethroned.McCall and Rahman both landed booming shots to earn stoppage wins. Such losses damage both ego and reputation, but can be shrugged off in a way Joshua’s collapse cannot.After being dropped by a fierce left hook, Ruiz arguably threw his own lucky shot when he caught Joshua on the temple, robbing him of his equilibrium and planting seeds of doubt to shackle him the next time he goes for the big finishes that were the foundation of a sparkling career.The vision remains the same! Thank you to everyone who traveled, MSG was lively! #TeamAJ pic.twitter.com/vVVgmXcyXw— Anthony Joshua (@anthonyfjoshua) June 2, 2019While Klitschko let his moment pass at Wembley, Ruiz boxed with both skill and intelligence to take the beleaguered champion apart.He launched calculated body attacks to sap his wounded foe. After his trips to the floor in the seventh, Joshua stood propped up in his corner with nothing left.That meant the defeat had more in common with Tyson’s against Douglas, a reverse where rivals can take note of the path laid out by an underdog outsider.WBC king Deontay Wilder undoubtedly enjoyed witnessing Joshua’s questionable punch resistance, Tyson Fury will have observed his struggles with Ruiz’s deceptively fast hands and Dillian Whyte will wonder why he did not bring his “Body Snatcher” nickname to bear when he was knocked out by Joshua in 2015.All should rue not putting themselves in the position to snaffle the division’s most valuable “0” as the affable Ruiz — a late replacement for Jarrell Miller — did.Tyson’s Tokyo torment came as his private life descended into a bleak soap opera, while Lewis fought Rahman at altitude with a woeful lack of preparation.Excuses may emerge over the coming days and weeks, but Joshua was in fine condition and the star of his own lucrative show as it hit boxing’s money market. The lack of mitigating circumstances is another damning element.last_img read more