Bayonne bank on building momentum

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS “I have to say we were quite surprised to see that Connacht lost to the newcomers Cavalieri – maybe they went through a bad phase.“Personally speaking I have never played against the Irish province but they are always there, like the stalwarts of this tournament.“They did really well last season, qualifying for the semi-finals before losing to Toulon in an extremely tight game.“And with five Irish internationals in their squad they don’t lack talent and they are very physical by tradition.“However, we will prepare with the intention to win at Connacht and keep our momentum going because if we want to get a quarter-final we have got to get results from everywhere.“We will try to come away from Ireland if not with a win then at least with a bonus point but most of all we want to have a big game.“Our strength at the moment is that we don’t let go, we are committed 100 per cent from kick-off time to the final whistle. And that is a quality that both English and Irish squads master as well.“They rarely let their guard down and they put on constant pressure. “Up front I think we are rather good in gaining territory, so if we can get on the front foot in that area that’ll help our backs make the difference.“I think Connacht have the same assets – they are very solid up front and fast in the three-quarters.”center_img Pépito Elhorga guided Bayonne safely through both a torrential downpour and the best efforts of Harlequins to bank the four Pool 1 points on offer and give them the perfect incentive for the test on Friday night against Connacht Rugby at the Sportsground.In atrocious conditions they outscored the Quins 2-0 in tries to notch up their debut tournament win against British opposition in 15 attempts.And the 18-times capped full back has set his sights on seeing that backed up with another win in Bayonne’s first clash with an Irish side.“Starting with a win in the Amlin Challenge Cup is great news for us especially since we registered three domestic defeats in a row, so that performance cheered us up big time,” he said.“The other good news is that we will benefit from our full squad; all our players are fit following our Round 1 game.“The conditions were terrible in that game against the Harlequins but that didn’t stop us from playing the ball. They came with strong intentions since they want to do well in the tournament, and so do we.We had to win that Round 1 match so it’s a big relief and a much needed moral boost.“On top of that we are now provisionally first in our group so it’s the best start we could hope for to go through to the knock-out stages.“It’s been a long time since Bayonne have experienced a final so we want to get at least a home quarter final.“However, our ambitions are the same as those of Harlequins and Connacht so it’s going to be tough until the very end.last_img read more

O’Callaghan pays tribute to Paul Darbyshire

first_imgTAGS: Munster Paul Darbyshire and Munster celebrate their Magners League victory in MayThe rugby community in Ireland was struck by the news that Paul Darbyshire passed away in the early hours of Monday morning, 20 June. Munster’s head of strength and conditioning was diagnosed with motor neurone disease in September last year, and died peacefully in his sleep, aged 41.The news came as players and supporters from all four Irish provinces were embarking on the second day of a cycle ride to raise money for the Darbyshire family and research into the illness. The route covers over 270 miles, and started at Musgrave Park, Cork on Sunday, and will finish in Darbyshire’s home town of Warrington, near Liverpool, on Thursday. Every member of the Munster squad has been involved in the event whether taking part in the cycling or pitching up for the craic and to lend a hand, in support of an integral member of their team.Donncha O’Callaghan was just one player turning out for the second leg of the journey, cycling the 46 miles from Thomond Park to Roscrea RFC. Speaking to Rugby World in May, O’Callaghan said: “The initial shock when we heard the news of his diagnosis was frightening for us because Darbs around our squad is like Superman. He brought an unbelievable professionalism to us, and the mindset that your body could do anything and would never fail.”Darbyshire maintained his involvement with the Munster squad and was present at the team’s home games throughout the season, despite his illness. He also had a hand in devising the cycle ride, no easy journey, just like his training sessions!Darbyshire played rugby league for Warrington Wolves, and stayed with the club in a coaching capacity after his retirement in 1997, before committing to Munster 10 years later. Darbyshire was a popular member of every team he was part of, and a tribute will be made at the Wolves’ game against St Helens on Friday. “It’s incredibly sad, especially for such a great fella, a great friend who was great at his job. All our first thoughts were for Darbs and his beautiful family, his four kids and his lovely wife Lyndsay. It’s going to be a massive loss for us in terms of our coach, but the hole that’s going to be left by his friendship is the thing that you’ll never be able to put into words.”The cyclists are travelling from Portlaoise RFC to Maynooth, and will finish the Irish stage of the journey at Trinity College, Dublin on Tuesday before it heads to Warrington via Colwyn Bay on Wednesday and Thursday. Why not take part, or go and cheer the team on their way? Click here for more details and to find out how to donate. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS It’s not just rugby’s stars who have been touched by Darbyshire’s story, and members of the hurling, football and cycling communities from all the provinces have clubbed together to lend their support.O’Callaghan continued: “When it comes to sport some things are put into perspective and the whole sporting community comes together, which is only right. This crosses over both codes because Darbs has some massive friends in Warrington, and for both codes to come together is a great idea.last_img read more

SCOTLAND: The paupers of the Euro debate

first_img“I buy the [issue concerning] governance of the game, hugely,” O’shea said. “ That is a massive, massive part of what this is about and that has to be sacrosanct, but the development of the game and saying that they’ll fall apart if you don’t have an Italian side in it for a season or two seasons is, from my point of view, wrong.”Then he was given the poser by Horgan that there should be a sense of responsibility if the Scots sides were hammered, failed to qualify, lost crowds, lost players and couldn’t sign stars from abroad. O’Shea replied: “You know what you’ll do? You’ll get a Scottish Rugby Union invest in bringing through their own players, play their own players, develop their own players, retain their own players and actually see them come through as a force rather than bringing in loads of players which they are doing at the moment.“They did it when they started and said ‘we’re going to have two districts, let the Borders go’. Don’t look and sympathise all the time and say that they didn’t have the opportunity. It would be like me going down and saying: ‘Munster? We won’t have Munster.’ They went to the Borders and said: ‘no Borders.’ How can you do that?”Some may see this as irrelevant, particularly as most pundits would concede that Glasgow Warriors have improved yearly and look set to finish in a top six again this term with a majority of Scots, but the issue of foreign input does come up elsewhere. Getting involved: Sean Maitland of Glasgow Warriors tries desperately to save a try in last season’s Heineken CupBy Alan DymockCRIERS ALL over the land are shouting: ‘the Heineken Cup is dead. Long live the potential for an accord between the Anglo-French alliance and a possibly toothless and certainly smarting governing body.’As clear as mud and just as pretty, the dialogue between unyielding factions on the future of European rugby seems unlikely to produce a dialectic any time soon. Not that it can ever end badly for the English or French. Whatever happens they will have forced through massive change.Is that necessarily a bad thing? It depends on your stance. However, there are views to be taken and ones that can bridge the concerns of more than one nation.Heart on his sleeve: Quins’ Conor O’SheaTake Conor O’Shea, for example. An Irishman in charge of one of the bigger teams in England, he took part in a debate on the future of European rugby on Irish channel RTE at the weekend. He spoke with Shane Horgan and Donal Lenihan of his desire for the best teams throughout Europe, not just England and France, to take part and said he believed that it would happen because if there is a will there will be a way.However it was after this point that Scotland and Italy came up. Forever branded the rag-dressed paupers of the debate, it was batted back and forth that either Union would crumble into powdery messes after a few seasons out of top European competition or that they could, maybe, perhaps develop in an Amlin-alike competition.Ignoring the fact that all involved in this debate assumed that neither Scottish side would make a top six finish – despite Glasgow Warriors being one of the best teams in the division for a few years now – or that a tricky Treviso side would ever be capable of raising it’s game, it all came back to their shortcomings. PORT ELIZABETH, SOUTH AFRICA – JULY 06: Cornell du Preez of the Southern Kings breaks the tackle of Elton Jantjies of the Stormers during the Super Rugby match between Southern Kings and DHL Stormers at Nelson Mandela Bay Stadium on July 06, 2013 in Port Elizabeth, South Africa. (Photo by Richard Huggard/Gallo Images/Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Another import: Cornell Du Preez has joined EdinburghThere are only two places for Scots teenagers to aspire to at the moment, if you do not count London Scottish. The bed has been made and the sheets may be crinkly and scratchy, but there must be a goal for young Scots to develop into a major competition. Edinburgh signing a South African back-row this week, Cornell Du Preez, may make them an uglier outfit, but it isn’t a move in the best interest of Scotland.Maybe Donal Lenihan is right. He said in the debate that they should seek to “ring-fence” one Scots and Italian team for Heineken 2.0. If that happened then they could cave in on some financial demands and distribution rights. A few years in the second-tier European competition is not an exile. Plus every proposal so far has suggested that the winners of the Amlin-alike qualify for the Heineken-alike a year later. Hardly the stuff of nightmares.last_img read more

‘Relentless’ Saracens through to another Champions Cup final

first_img TAGS: MunsterSaracens — Murray Kinsella (@Murray_Kinsella) April 20, 2019At the heart of Saracens’ winning performance in the Midlands was academy product and England scrum-half Ben Spencer, who started ahead of the most-capped Premiership player in history, Richard Wigglesworth.“Ben’s had a great season this year, he’s started probably more European Cup games this year than any other season,” McCall said. “Obviously we have two great scrum-halves in Wiggy as well.Space invader: Ben Spencer breaks from Jean Kleyn (Getty Images)“He’s (Wigglesworth) had a tough time with an injury, he’s done one training session in the last eight weeks I think it is, one rugby session. So it’s good to have him back today and have his experience on the bench.“But Ben is playing really well, he had a great game against Glasgow in the quarter-final, and equally he played really well today.”After finishing just three points ahead of Munster at half-time, Saracens got off to a fast start in the second half, with blindside flanker Michael Rhodes touching down for the first try in the 44th minute. That score, and three subsequent penalties from Owen Farrell, turned the screw on Johann van Graan’s men.Over time: Darren Sweetnam scores Munster’s only try (Getty Images)Munster captain Peter O’Mahony said: “We played rugby in areas we probably didn’t plan in doing so as a result of being down by that much.“With their defence, the way they go after teams, particularly in their own half, it makes it that little bit more difficult when you are trying things that if we were closer or ahead we probably wouldn’t be doing. When you make mistakes in that area or concede penalties, you’re conceding three points.”Munster’s thoughts now turn to focus purely on domestic action in the Guinness Pro14 while Saracens are still competing on two fronts. Ali Stokes reports on how Saracens saw off Munster to reach European finale in Newcastle Billy Vunipola was confronted by a Munster fan on the pitch after the game.Roundly booed by Munster fans throughout the game. pic.twitter.com/lhEQRELzhu ‘Relentless’ Saracens through to another Champions Cup final Under the scorching sun of an early summer day in the Midlands and in the wake of a difficult week following the uproar caused by Billy Vunipola’s Instagram post defending the comments of Israel Folau, Saracens qualified for a fourth European Champions Cup final in six years by beating Munster 32-16 at the Ricoh Arena.Following the now familiar sight of yet another classic Saracens victory in the knockout stages of Europe, Mark McCall was quick to praise the intensity and mentality of his charges.“I thought we played really well,” said the Sarries director of rugby. “Although the scoreboard said 12-9 at half-time, it didn’t feel like that. The thing that pleased me most was that the players understood that the scoreboard did not necessarily reflect how well we had played and what we were building towards.“I was just really pleased with our intensity, which was relentless the whole game, and the control we had emotionally as well.”Power surge: Billy Vunipola tries to make ground against Munster (Getty Images)Any suggestion of Vunipola feeling the pressure was quickly dispelled. The England No 8 was at the forefront of Saracens’ trademark power game, claiming the final try of the day in the 72nd minute and being named Man of the Match.McCall said: “Billy was outstanding, so were all of his team-mates to be honest. We got all the big parts of our game right today and a great team effort.“As a group we were determined not to let this week pass us by because we work incredibly hard to be involved in weeks like this one, games like this one. And we ended up having a brilliant week and you can see that in the performance.”Commenting on the social media post that led to Vunipola being booed throughout the match and being confronted by a Munster fan afterwards, McCall said: “The club dealt with it, it’s been dealt with, it was dealt with decisively, it was dealt with quickly and it was dealt with, in my opinion, fairly.”center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Happy day: Saracens fly-half Owen Farrell celebrates beating Munster (Getty Images) Who they will play in Champions Cup final at St James’ Park on 11 May will be decided later today, when reigning champions Leinster host resurgent French giants Toulouse. If Saracens v Munster was an arm-wrestle, Leinster v Toulouse is likely to be a 100m race.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.last_img read more

Champions Cup Team Of The Tournament

first_img European Champions Cup final likened to Test match Expand LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Champions Cup Team Of The TournamentThe 2018-19 Champions Cup tournament has been completed and Saracens emerged victorious thanks to a stunning victory over Leinster in the final hosted in Newcastle.Related: Saracens crowned European championsIt was a fantastic and hard-fought tournament so to celebrate this we have put together our ideal XV for the event.Champions Cup Team of the TournamentAs you would expect several Saracens and Leinster players have made it into out team of the tournament. But by no means is every position filled by a player from the English or Irish sides…1. Mako Vunipola (Saracens)Mako’s consistently high level of scrummaging, carrying and work-rate gets him the nod in our XV. Special mentions should go to Cian Healy and Pierre Schoeman.2. Sean Cronin (Leinster)Jamie George was excellent throughout the tournament but Cronin is picked here thanks to his try tally, with his six touchdowns making him the joint top try-scorer alongside Ulster wing Jacob Stockdale.3. Tadhg Furlong (Leinster)On the face of it he didn’t appear as effective as last season but that just shows how high he has set the bar for himself. Unquestionably the top dog at tighthead, Furlong’s selection should surprise no one.Stat stuffer: Ryan’s work-rate always sees him at the top of leaderboards (Getty Images)4. James Ryan (Leinster)Leinster and Ireland have found an absolute gem in Ryan. He regularly tops statistics in tackles and carries, and the term workhorse only goes some way to describing how good this guy is.5. Tadhg Beirne (Munster)The sole representative from Munster in our XV, Beirne led the competition with 15 turnovers and consistently helped to alleviate pressure on their defence.6. Maro Itoje (Saracens)Solid in every position he has been required to play in, we selected Itoje in the back row because of the work of Beirne and Ryan. That isn’t to say he doesn’t warrant his selection, though, because the England man raised his game to help his side win the title.Tight Contest: Watson beat out several other flankers to make it into our team (Getty Images)7. Hamish Watson (Edinburgh) Collapse English side lift European Champions Cup trophy for… Watson was vital to Edinburgh’s Champions Cup success this year. His tireless work as a ball-carrier and in defence differentiated him from Francois Louw, Jackson Wray and Rynhardt Elstadt.8. Billy Vunipola (Saracens)Vunipola has proved himself to be the premier No 8 in the competition, especially during the knockout rounds. His powerful semi-final and final performances are of particular note. Saracens beat Leinster to be crowned European champions Saracens beat Leinster to be crowned European champions Lions 2021 Sam Warburton and Ronan O’Gara among favourites to assist Warren Gatlandcenter_img European Champions Cup final likened to Test match Saracens and Leinster players compare physicality in Newcastle… Once again he delivered in every single minute of Saracens successful campaign. He may not be in Eddie Jones’s thinking but he is undoubtedly one of the best full-backs in the world. He was named European Player of the Year to boot.What do you make of our selections? Is there any who you think is missing and should have made it in? Let us know via our social media channels on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Who makes it into our Champions Cup team of the tournament? Take a look here Lions 2021 Sam Warburton and Ronan O’Gara among… 9. Antoine Dupont (Toulouse)It is shocking to think Dupont is only 22 years old but his meteoric rise has seen him become one of the most incisive scrum-halves in the world. He has also shown his ability in the No 10 jersey a couple of times during the tournament.10. Owen Farrell (Saracens)Finn Russell and Danny Cipriani were both good during the tournament but Farrell is the beating heart of an immensely successful Saracens side.Taking Flight: Liam Williams was imperious under the high ball (Getty Images)11. Liam Williams (Saracens)I cannot remember the last time the Welshman made a mistake on the wing or at full-back. He is brilliant in the air, always makes the correct decision and is more difficult to bring down than most expect. During the final his tackle and steal whilst Leinster were in the ascendency was a massive moment.12. Brad Barritt (Saracens)He may not be the most flamboyant back in the world but his leadership and physical play is always vital in giving Saracens key front-foot ball.13. Garry Ringrose (Leinster)Alex Lozowski was sublime in the final but we have gone for Ringrose here. Defensively he is arguably the best centre in the world and he offers key support in the back-line alongside Johnny Sexton and Robbie Henshaw.Lighting Footwork: Kolbe was one of the most exciting players throughout the tournament (getty Images)14. Cheslin Kolbe (Toulouse)His evasive footwork and elusive running lit up the tournament. Several of the tries Toulouse scored owe themselves to his play.15. Alex Goode (Saracens) Lions 2021 Sam Warburton and Ronan O’Gara among favourites to assist Warren Gatland Expandlast_img read more

What Is The Sin-Bin In Rugby?

first_imgWe explain what has become one of the most common terms in rugby – the sin-bin Rugby World Cup Fixtures 2023 Take a look at all the matches that… Rugby World Cup Venues Collapse Rugby World Cup Venues When yellow cards first came in, they did not carry the ten minutes in the bin penalty. Ben Clarke, the former back-rower, was the first player to be shown one in an International when referee Patrick Thomas did the honours in England’s 20-8 win over Ireland in Dublin in 1995. What you need to know about the 12… 2019 Rugby World Cup TV Coverage What Is The Sin-Bin In Rugby?The 2019 Rugby World Cup will not be immune from acts of ill-discipline and sin-binnings, but what exactly is the sin-bin? We take a look below.In essence, players are shown yellow cards and have to spend ten minutes off the pitch in the ‘sin-bin’ if they commit a variety of offences ranging from foul play to indiscipline to backchat.The sin-bin in Test matches, rugby’s naughty step, is normally a seat somewhere between where the two teams’ pitch-side staff and replacements are stationed during play.Two yellow cards, even if they are for relatively minor offences like a deliberate knock-on, trigger an automatic red. This happened to Jonny May playing for Leicester against Saracens in December 2017 and although it seemed harsh at the time the wing was not suspended.If a player gets three yellow cards for foul play in a season then he or she is hauled in front of a disciplinary panel.Often you will see a team warned for persistent foul play, such as killing the ball when they are under the cosh in defence, and the next offender ‘takes one for the team’ and is binned.Lawrence Dallaglio and Neil Back were both given ten minutes for this in England’s 15-13 win over New Zealand in 2003 in Wellington, leaving their team down to 13 men but they hung on. 2019 Rugby World Cup Warm-Ups Expandcenter_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Rugby World Cup Fixtures 2023 Expand Rugby World Cup Fixtures The 2023 Rugby World… 2019 Rugby World Cup TV Coverage Held in Japan for the first time, make… 2019 Rugby World Cup Warm-Ups Expand But Clarke did not leave the field after been found guilty of stamping on Simon Geoghegan, the Ireland wing and a Bath team-mate. In those days, yellow cards were just a warning.Australian centre James Holbeck was the first player to get his ten-minute marching orders for a yellow card in the 1997 Tri-Nations match against South Africa in Pretoria.2019 Rugby World Cup Yellow Cards7 – Samoa (Ed Fidow 2, T J Ioane 2, Rey Lee-Lo, Motu Matu’u, Seilala Lam)3 – Fiji  (Levani Botia, Tevita Cavubati, Semi Kunatani); Russia (Kirril Gotovtsev, Bogdan Fedokto, Andrei Ostrikov); Australia (Adam Coleman, Lukhan Salakai-Loto, Isi Naisarani).2 – New Zealand (Nepo Laulala, Ofa Tuungafasi); Wales (Ken Owens, James Davies); Namibia (Adriaan Boysen, Aranos Coetzee).1 – Georgia (Jaba Bregvadze); Canada (Matt Heaton); Ireland (Tadhg Beirne); Uruguay (Santiago Civetto). Follow our Rugby World Cup homepage which we update regularly with news and features. Also make sure you know about the Groups, Warm-ups, Dates, Fixtures, Venues, TV Coverage, Qualified Teams by clicking on the highlighted links.Finally, don’t forget to follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.last_img read more

Book review: The self-roast of Ian Smith

first_img TAGS: Book Review A Full-Back Slower Than Your Average Prop by Ian Smith is published by Arena Sport, RRP £17.99, and comes highly recommended.BUY NOW with Amazon Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Rea, a twice-capped Irish centre, was at Edinburgh University and for a couple of years, 1967 and 1968, the student side ran riot against the best club sides in England and Scotland. Ian Smith, studying dentistry, was part of that team.There were three basic moves: miss one (ten passes to 13), miss two (12 passes to 15), and a dummy scissors (between ten and 12, followed by a pass to 13).Student gig: the Edinburgh University team of 1967-68, with Smith seated just to the right of the captainWith no such thing as analysis then, and no TV coverage of Edinburgh University, they were able to bemuse team after team. For example, they crushed mighty Bedford 20-0 away even though they were up all night at a ball whilst their opponents were tucked up in bed.The try Smith scored to beat the Boks came from a dummy scissors move called by Robertson, and the try he scored against France was from a ‘miss two’ move. What fun a modern-day analyst would have if he was able to go back 50 years in a time tunnel!Another engrossing topic in Smith’s book concerns the fear factor. “It’s not something you often read about in autobiographies, but I need to be honest about how I felt,” he writes.“As a full-back there was the fear as I waited under the first high ball of the season, the first high ball of a match. I prayed that no one ever saw the fear I felt, and that my ability was up to the task of catching that ball and taking whatever tackles and blows came as a result without flinching.“Was it better to be brave, stand your ground and drop a high ball, or just not quite be in the right place, leaving another to take what was rightfully yours and thus appear blameless?”Happy family: a Christmas gathering in 2017. Smith lives in Norfolk, where he ended his playing daysThis fear never left him. When, in the week of the 1970 Calcutta Cup match, someone remarked on Sportsnight that Smith had “never been tested under the high ball”, he was physically sick. He then suffered three sleepless nights dreading what the English fly-half, Roger Shackleton, might do to him that Saturday.A year later, he made himself available for the game with Wales despite having a shoulder injury. He didn’t want to risk losing his place if he pulled out. In what proved one of the epic matches, won by John Taylor’s touchline conversion, Smith admits startlingly: “I proceeded to not be in quite the right place for most of the Welsh tries so I didn’t have to tackle.”Ultimately, the “mental torture”, of recalling past mistakes and the prospect of making new ones, brought a permanent end to his Test career. He asked for an overseas posting with the Army so that he wouldn’t be available for Scotland.There are a number of light-hearted tales to go with the serious introspection; a few interesting views too on the flaws of modern rugby. Like we say, the book engages on many levels and it is all the better for that.After some adventures in Hong Kong, Ian Smith moved to East Anglia. He played his final game of rugby for West Norfolk 2nds. Seeing that the opposition had turned their backs at a penalty award, he tried a ‘tap and go’ from distance. He was just able to stagger over the line for a try but promptly threw up over the referee’s boots! Space invader: on the attack against New South Wales during Scotland’s 1970 tour of Australia Book review: The self-roast of Ian SmithIan Smith learnt he had been picked for Scotland when a Daily Mail reporter, the late Terry O’Connor, rang him at home. “Congratulations,” he said to Smith, “but who are you?”Since Smith was playing for London Scottish 3rds at the time, it was a fair enough question. Smith was to win nine Test caps, the last of them for Hong Kong, from 1969-72. He became the first Scotland full-back to score an international try, a late three-pointer that did for the Springboks on his debut at Murrayfield. He scored again in his next outing against France.If that all sounds a bit ‘boy’s own’, let us disavail you. Smith’s career was far more about fears and insecurity, put-downs and rejection. One correspondent called him one of the six worst international rugby selections of all time. “He may well have been right!” Smith says.Magic moment: Smith (left) scores the winning try on his Scotland debut to beat South Africa 6-3 in 1969The Dundee-born Scot cheerfully explores all this in his stunningly good autobiography A Full-Back Slower Than Your Average Prop. The title alludes to a disparaging remark about his pace, the player being told to stay out of the line because he “slowed everyone down”.BUY NOW with Amazon It’s a book that engages you on many levels. For starters, it takes you back to a time devoid of computers and mobile phones, washing machines and freezers. Not everyone had a television and rugby coverage on the box was scarce.Thus, after Smith had a strong game for Combined Services, the Scotland selectors planned a trip south en masse. They wanted to watch him play for London Scottish to see if the previous week’s performance had just been a fluke! As it happens, the match was cancelled.Proud: Smith took a while to make London Scottish’s first XVAfter being capped by Scotland, Smith was promoted to the first XV at London Scottish only because it was club policy to do so. It meant moving the first XV captain, Gordon Macdonald (a brief Scotland cap), to fly-half. He didn’t speak to Smith for the rest of that season.Of course, it worked both ways. When Smith was later axed by Scotland, he was also dropped by London Scottish, the Army and Combined Services. All in a ten-day period!Smith’s self-deprecating humour punctuates the pages. You only have to look at the chapter headings to see his slant on things: You are too small to be a centre. You have to be a lot quicker if this is going to work. What do you mean you dropped 14 balls? You are too fat and idle to play at this level.In the summer of 1969, when he was consuming a full English fried breakfast and seven pints of full-cream milk daily, Smith’s weight ballooned to over 15st.He got his Scotland chance after injuries to others and was labelled ‘lucky’. But, of course, there are no muppets on the Test stage. There are insights into the skill acquisition that enabled him to reach the highest level. Training in poor light at university was one surprising benefit; it improved his catching because seeing the ball late sharpened his reactions.Earlier, as a schoolboy at George Heriot’s in Edinburgh, he would climb over the wall of George Watson’s to practise kicking with a boy from that college. He later discovered that boy was Ian Robertson, a future Scotland team-mate and broadcasting great.Smith learnt how to screw-kick at a camp run by the Scottish Schoolboys Club and says he was eventually able to achieve perfect execution nine times out of ten.Into touch: tackling England wing John Novak. Ian Robertson (with hair) and Ali Biggar supportIn the Sixties, full-back was a purely defensive position. You were expected to catch, kick and tackle but not attack. That changed when the Australian Dispensation Law banning direct kicking into touch outside the 25 (now 22) was introduced.Step forward Harry Rea, an “inventive genius” who proposed a series of moves that, by modern standards, seem very simple. Yet at the time no one had seen anything like it. Former Scotland full-back Ian Smith is perfectly happy to play up his limitations. But amid the frazzled nerves and sceptical selectors is an outstanding autobiography LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

Follow England to Rugby World Cup France 2023

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS England play two Saturday matches at the city’s Stade Pierre Mauroy. Their opponents are still to emerge from the qualifying process. Based on recent form, Americas 2 is likely to be either USA or Uruguay while Oceania 1 will almost certainly be Samoa or Tonga.Whoever makes it through, it’s going to be an awesome experience for anyone privileged to be there. England head coach Eddie Jones said: “It’s probably the most contrasting pool in terms of style and philosophy of play and that’s what probably makes it the most interesting.“France has beautiful rugby grounds because rugby is the sport of a lot of the towns. It should be a fantastic festival of rugby.”England score against Argentina at RWC 2019 in Japan – the teams meet again in 2023 (Getty Images)So England fans, don’t delay! You can enjoy the tournament with Sportsbreaks.com, an Official Travel Agent for Rugby World Cup France 2023, whose expert-crafted travel packages not only include accommodation and tickets but official RWC 2023 merchandise too.In 2018, England finished fifth in the Six Nations but rebounded to come within a whisker of winning Rugby World Cup 2019. After another lowly finish in this year’s Six Nations, will England peak at just the right time at RWC 2023? Perhaps it is written in the stars…FIND OUT MOREBook a Sportsbreaks.com Match Break and you’ll get:Official Rugby World Cup 2023 match ticketsA minimum of two nights’ accommodation at one of their great-value hotelsEvent pack containing essential RWC 2023 merchandise24-hour Sportsbreaks.com representation service!And for a little bit extra, you can:Upgrade your Official Rugby World Cup 2023 match ticketsExtend your stay at one of their great-value hotelsEnhance your RWC 2023 experience with any club (or match) specific packages/events that become available. They’ll let you know as and when any optional extras are available to book, offering information on how you can add these to your trip. Find out more details atsportsbreaks.com/Rugby/Rugby-World-Cup-2023 Follow England to Rugby World Cup France 2023England flew 6,000 miles to get to Japan 2019 but the next Rugby World Cup in 2023 is just a hop across the Channel. And what delights await those supporters heading to France to see if England can emulate the 2003 team that became world champions 18 years ago.Their opening Pool D match is a Saturday evening humdinger in Stade Vélodrome against Argentina, who memorably defeated New Zealand for the first time last year.The host city, Marseille, lies in the Provence region but has a soul all of its own. A multicultural melting pot with strong North African influences, it features Le Vieux Port – the Old Port – where disbelieving English and French fans celebrated long into the night in 2007 after both nations had achieved shock quarter-final wins.Marseille conjures happy memories for England supporters after the thrills of Rugby World Cup 2007From wine tours to world-class museums, Marseille is a perfect sun-drenched location for fans to start their RWC 2023 experience. It will also host England’s quarter-final on 14 or 15 October should they progress to the knockout stage.From Marseille, England head 100 miles east along the French Riviera for a tantalising encounter against Japan, one of the sensations of the 2019 tournament. Nice is the venue for this one and supporters will love the stunning beaches and amazing views of this artistic city. The seven-mile Promenade des Anglais, built 200 years ago for holidaying members of the English aristocracy, is one of the most iconic roads in France.Among excursions you can take from Nice is a short boat trip to the island of Sainte-Marguerite, where the mysterious ‘Man in the Iron Mask’ was incarcerated.Stunning beaches and amazing views await in Nice, the venue for England’s second match of RWC 2023England’s remaining pool matches take place at the opposite end of the country, in the capital of French Flanders. Lille has a reputation for friendliness and fun in equal measure, with vibrant markets and a dynamic beer culture.Just 80 minutes from London by train, Lille’s unique character is manifest in red-brick buildings, medieval structures and cobblestone streets. And they love a street party here.ENGLAND RWC 2023 FIXTURESSat 9 Sept England v Argentina, Marseille (8pm, GMT)Sun 17 Sept England v Japan, Nice (8pm)Sat 23 Sept England v Americas 2, Lille (4.45pm)Sat 7 Oct England v Oceania 1, Lille (4.45pm) With Marseille, Nice and Lille on their schedule for Rugby World Cup 2023, England supporters are in for a treat. In partnership with Sportsbreaks.comcenter_img TAGS: Promotion England fans at Rugby World Cup 2019, when Eddie Jones’s team came so close to glory (Getty Images) Could fans see a repeat of England’s epic Rugby World Cup victory of 2003? (World Rugby/Getty Images)Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

Israel-Palestina: La Convención apoya la inversión positiva

first_img Rector Albany, NY Rector Shreveport, LA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Washington, DC General Convention, General Convention 2012, Por Matthew DaviesPosted Jul 12, 2012 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Submit an Event Listing Director of Music Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Tampa, FL Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Featured Events TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Youth Minister Lorton, VA Tags Rector Collierville, TN Israel-Palestine, Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Associate Rector Columbus, GA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 center_img Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Middle East Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit a Press Release The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group [Episcopal News Service — Indianápolis] La Cámara de Obispos, con la aprobación de los diputados, respaldó por abrumadora mayoría una resolución sobre la inversión positiva en los Territorios Palestinos. Pero los obispos convinieron en aplazar indefinidamente el diálogo sobre el compromiso corporativo.La Resolución B019 respalda la inversión positiva “como un medio necesario para crear una economía sana y una infraestructura sostenible” en los Territorios Palestinos. También le pide a la Iglesia que apoye “un estudio judío, musulmán y cristiano sobre la paz con justicia en el Oriente Medio” y produce una notable bibliografía de materiales de consulta.La Resolución C060, que convoca a la Iglesia a participar “en una responsabilidad corporativa social con un compromiso corporativo más vigoroso y público con compañías en la cartera de inversiones de la Iglesia que contribuyan a la infraestructura de la ocupación” fue postergada después de que el obispo Sean Rowe, de Pensilvania Noroccidental, pidió que la conversación fuese aplazada indefinidamente. Los diputados habían aprobado esa resolución el 9 de julio, pero aún requería del consentimiento de los obispos.El obispo Ed Little, del Norte de Indiana, dijo que le resolución lo perturbaba. “Acabamos de aprobar una resolución positiva y sólida en la B019”, pero la C060 “confunde de algún modo, pues la Iglesia Episcopal ya tiene una política de compromiso corporativo y esa política nos ha funcionado bien. Añadir esta resolución al paquete oscurecería la estupenda claridad de la B019”.Esa política llama a la Iglesia a una “inversión positiva” y al “compromiso corporativo” tal como recomendara en 2005 el informe del Comité de Responsabilidad Social en las Inversiones (SRI, por su sigla en inglés) que fuera refrendado por el Consejo Ejecutivo.El obispo Pierre Whalon, de la Convocación de Iglesias Episcopales en Europa, es miembro del Comité sobre Responsabilidad Social Corporativa del Consejo Ejecutivo, el sucesor del SRI. Él reconoció que la Iglesia Episcopal ya ejerce un “vigoroso compromiso corporativo” tal como recomendaba ese informe.El obispo Marc Andrus, de California, que fue miembro del Comité de Asuntos Nacionales e Internacionales de la Convención General que ha considerado la legislación sobre el conflicto israelí-palestino y que propuso las dos resoluciones, dijo que la B019 reafirma la voz local de la Iglesia. Agregó que la Iglesia Episcopal debe respetar las peticiones de Suheil Dawani, obispo anglicano de Jerusalén “y la frágil población cristiana y todas las personas que allí viven”.La B019 reafirma la política oficial de la Iglesia, basada en resoluciones aprobadas en sus anteriores convenciones generales, comprometiéndose a una solución de dos estados en la cual un Estado de Israel seguro y universalmente reconocido viva junto a un libre, viable y seguro Estado para el pueblo palestino con Jerusalén como la capital compartida de ambos.El obispo John Howe, de Florida Sudoccidental, que es miembro de la junta de los Amigos Americanos de la Diócesis de Jerusalén, dijo que éste fue el resultado que esa organización, que apoya las instituciones de servicio social de la diócesis, había esperado.El obispo Gene Robinson, de Nuevo Hampshire, instó a la aprobación de la C060, diciendo que el lenguaje era “notablemente moderado. Reclama un compromiso público más vigoroso. Eso es muy semejante a la última resolución en su tono moderado”.El obispo John Tarrant, de Dakota del Sur, instó a oponerse a la C060. Habló sobre el pueblo de Rawabi, que se encuentra actualmente en construcción al norte de Ramallah, en Cisjordania, y que ofrecerá oportunidades de adquirir propiedad de vivienda, empleo y educación a precios accesibles. Tarrant dijo que el proyecto, concebido por un grupo de empresarios palestinos, inyectaría alrededor de $80 millones en la economía israelí.“Eso me dio la idea de que hay palestinos que entienden la importancia de la mutualidad si los dos estados van a existir uno al lado del otro”, agregó.Él le recordó a la cámara del encargo de la Obispa Primada, Katharine Jefferts Schori, a los episcopales de “‘ir como emisarios… de entrar en el mundo del sueño de Dios’. Yo creo que hay palestinos e israelíes ahora mismo que van al mundo con el sueño de Dios”.El obispo Charles Bennison, de Pensilvania, dijo que el movimiento de apoyar boicots, desinversiones y sanciones contra Israel “es desaconsejable. Necesitamos más, no menos, nexos económicos con Israel. Cuanto más aislado esté Israel tanto más peligrosa se hace la situación”.Luego de la decisión de los obispos, el diputado Newland Smith, de Chicago, miembro del comité legislativo, dijo a ENS que se sentía desilusionado por la decisión de los obispos. “La Iglesia ha hecho algún esfuerzo [en el terreno del compromiso corporativo], pero ha sido muy privado, y la resolución (C060) exigía una atención más enérgica en pro de una paz justa en Israel y Palestina. El comité dejó bien claro que no favorece la desinversión”.Smith se contaba entre los cinco miembros del comité que el 9 de julio firmaron un informe de la minoría en que expresaban su “decepción de que la 77ª. Convención General no hubiera ido bastante más lejos al considerar las medidas que aumentarían la conciencia y el activismo al objeto de ponerle fin a la ocupación de Palestina”.Alex Baumgarten, director de la Oficina de Relaciones Gubernamentales de la Iglesia Episcopal, dijo a ENS que la Convención General “ha expresado con claridad que el logro de una paz justa entre israelíes y palestinos es una prioridad para toda la Iglesia Episcopal”.La Resolución B019, agregó él, demanda un diálogo extenso y a fondo que se desarrollará en la Iglesia a lo largo del próximo trienio “y resulta claro que se trata de una conversación que puede y debe incluir a personas de todas las perspectivas sobre el tema. Resulta claro que una paz justa para los palestinos tendría que ser también una paz justa para los israelíes y sería en beneficio de ambos pueblos y del mundo”.A principios de la semana, el Comité de Asuntos Nacionales e Internacionales discutió 14 resoluciones sobre el conflicto israelí-palestino, que iban desde pedirle a la Iglesia que respaldara una mayor inversión económica en los Territorios Palestinos, lo cual serviría para apoyar la creación de un futuro Estado, a pedirle a la Iglesia que desinvirtiera en las compañías israelíes que lucran con la ocupación de tierras palestinas.Después de oír el testimonio público y de considerar toda la legislación relacionada, el comité sometió sus resoluciones a la consideración de las cámaras de la Convención General.Otros artículos anteriores sobre resoluciones y el testimonio público en relación con Israel y Palestina pueden encontrarse aquí.– Matthew Davies es director y reportero de Episcopal News Service. Traducido por Vicente Echerri. Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Curate Diocese of Nebraska Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Belleville, IL Rector Smithfield, NC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Advocacy Peace & Justice, This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Israel-Palestina: La Convención apoya la inversión positiva Los obispos convienen en aplazar indefinidamente el debate sobre el compromiso corporativo Featured Jobs & Calls Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Martinsville, VA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Bath, NC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Knoxville, TN last_img read more

Video: Mozambique partnership addresses malaria, intense flooding

first_img Submit an Event Listing Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Tampa, FL Submit a Job Listing Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Africa, By Matthew DaviesPosted Dec 17, 2014 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Anglican Communion, Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Video Submit a Press Release Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Episcopal Relief & Development, Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Featured Events Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Pittsburgh, PA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Albany, NY center_img Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS [Episcopal News Service] With picture postcard landscapes, rich agricultural possibilities, and a people committed to a sustainable future, Mozambique is a place of great beauty and potential.But intense seasonal flooding, periodic droughts and the burden of malaria and other communicable diseases continue to bring suffering to much of the population.Responding to these crises and encouraging sustainability has been the focus of Anglican Social Action (ASA), the relief and development arm of the Diocese of Lebombo.Episcopal Relief & Development has partnered with ASA through the malaria prevention program NetsforLife®, community development initiatives, and in responding to the immediate impact and long-term recovery from flooding disasters.This video is also featured here as part of Episcopal Relief & Development’s 75 stories over 75 weeks project to celebrate the agency’s 75th anniversary. The 75-week celebration will continue through the end of 2015.Another video report about how this partnership fosters sustainable livelihoods is available here and below. Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Martinsville, VA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Collierville, TN Featured Jobs & Calls Press Release Service Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Belleville, IL Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Bath, NC Tags Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Hopkinsville, KY Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Curate Diocese of Nebraska Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Video: Mozambique partnership addresses malaria, intense flooding Rector Shreveport, LA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Director of Music Morristown, NJ Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA last_img read more