NIA raids houses of Salahuddin’s sons in Valley

first_imgThe National Investigation Agency (NIA) on Thursday carried out searches at the residence Shahid Yousuf Shah, son of Hizbul Mujahideen chief Syed Salahuddin, in central Kashmir’s Budagm. Another son’s premises were also searchedShahid Yousuf Shah was sent on a seven-day custody of NIA by a court in New Delhi on Wednesday. Unconfirmed reports suggest that the NIA seized five mobile phones and a laptop during the searches.Hurriyat chairman Mirwaiz Umar Farooq and JKLF chief Yasin Malik have described the detention of Shah as “political vendetta to pressurise Salahuddin”.Meanwhile, the United Jehad Council on Wednesday condemned the arrest Yousuf Shah. “Innocents are being framed in fabricated cases,” said UJC spokesman in Pakistan Occupied Kashmir.last_img read more

Karnataka leaders ask Goa to release drinking water from Mahadayi

first_imgPanaji: Bharatiya Janata Party leaders form Karnataka have urged Goa Chief Minister Manohar Parrikar to allow water for drinking purpose for Karnataka from the Mahadayi river.This request was made at a meeting in New Delhi on Wednesday held at the residence of BJP president Amit Shah. Among those present, apart from Mr. Parrikar, were former Karnataka Chief Minister Yeddiyurappa; Union Minister for Chemicals and Fertilisers, Ananth Kumar; Union Minister for Human Resource Development, Prakash Javadekar; and Karnataka MP Prahlad Joshi.Mr. Parrikar told The Hindu that the Karnataka leaders submitted a petition with their request to allow release of Mahadayi water for drinking water purpose.“I listened to them and told them that our response will be sent to them in writing. No formula has been discussed or given. Everything will be done and communicated in writing,” Mr. Parrikar said. The long-simmering river water dispute between Goa and Karnataka has been with the Mahadayi Water Dispute Tribunal over the latter’s controversial Kalsa-Bhandura dam projects across the Mahadayi, which is known as the Mandovi river once it enters Goa. Considered the lifeline of Goa, it originates in Karnataka and meets the Arabian Sea in Panaji. While the river traverses 28.8 km in Karnataka, its major length of 81.2 km is in Goa. Karnataka’s plans to construct seven dams on the river, aimed at diverting the waters into its water-starved Malaprabha basin in North Karnataka have been challenged by Goa in an inter-State Tribunal.last_img read more

Jumbo problem for Odisha forest officials

first_imgAn elephant separated from its herd has been wreaking havoc in Khamar forest range in Odisha’s Angul district for the past fortnight.It has killed three persons so far and is getting aggressive by the day as villagers keep chasing the animal whenever it comes near human habitations.Although a dedicated trackers’ team has been deployed to keep tabs on the jumbo, regular confrontations have been a cause for concern for the field-level staff of forest department. Angry villagers have threatened to kill the elephant if the problem is not solved immediately. A team of police personnel was deployed in the Khamar forest in the wake of the tension on Wednesday.“We have written to our higher-ups requesting to drive the elephant away to a far-off forest area,” said Sukesh Kumar Shatrushalya, the Khamar Forest Range Officer. “Widespread preparation of country liquor has made the matter worse. The elephant often raids the villages for the liquor,” he said.No isolated incidentThree human deaths in Khamar forest range is not an isolate incidents. In Odisha, between April 2010 and December 2017, as many as 547 people have been killed and 288 have been injured in confrontations with wild elephants. During the same period, 571 elephants have died.“In most cases, nearly 60% of the time, the confrontation is with the tuskers. There are particular tuskers who are aggressive and account for many kills. It is possible to prevent these confrontations if the tuskers are identified and continuously tracked, so that information about their movements can be passed on to local farmers if they are anywhere close to them,” said Biswajit Mohanty, secretary, Wildlife Society of Orissa, a non-government organisation.“It has been found that elephant herds are teased and harassed by young men, which irritates them. When they come across old people who cannot run, they chase and kill them in vengeance. Many people have also been killed when the elephants are being harassed,” said Mr. Mohanty. In Dhenkanal district, the forest department had removed the tusk of a male elephant which was responsible for injuries to more than three dozen people.last_img read more

Don’t take over Naik’s assets: panel

first_imgThe Prevention of Money Laundering Act Appellate Tribunal has ordered “status quo”, preventing the Enforcement Directorate from taking possession of two immovable properties that the agency has attached in the Zakir Naik case. The Directorate said it would challenge the decision in the Delhi High Court.The order pertains to a Chennai-based school and a commercial property in Mumbai. After they were provisionally attached last year, the adjudicating authority confirmed the order. Zakir Naik’s legal representatives then challenged the move in the Appellate Tribunal.During a hearing, the Tribunal asked the Directorate not to take further action pertaining to the two immovable assets.last_img read more

Unlike Vibrant Gujarat, we mean serious business: Maharashtra Minister Subhash Desai

first_imgAhead of the Magnetic Maharashtra investment summit starting this Sunday, the State Industries Minister Subhash Desai has termed some of the investment pacts signed at the Vibrant Gujarat investor summits as ‘laughable’ as they even included agreements signed by the State government with its own departments to build public facilities.“I had a look at Gujarat’s website. I was astonished. They have signed Memorandum of Understanding (MoUs) with their own departments. For example, Women & Child Welfare department of Gujarat signed an MoU to construct some thousand anganwadis. Now what is the use [of doing that]?” Mr. Desai asked.“Even we can do that, may be (sign pacts) with the education, power or any other department. And that department’s Budget could be shown as the investment. Maharashtra does not do such laughable MoUs… We are into serious investments,” the minister stressed. “It could be Vibrant Gujarat or Karnataka. These States claim to sign MoUs but do not see the investment materialising on the ground and nobody even enquires (about them) after the event,” said Mr. Desai. Budget bluesMr. Desai said the Budget’s farm focus reflects the the Gujarat election results on the Narendra Modi government as this could be the last Budget before the Lok Sabha elections in 2019.“The way BJP received drubbing in rural areas of Gujarat, it is clear that rural area was on BJP’s priority list this time. But these benefits should reach farmers,” he said. “The Finance Minister did mention about giving one-and-a-half times returns on farmers’ input costs. But nobody knows when will it be seen on ground, whether it will be from this year or the next year?” he asked.Complex taxationMr. Desai said the tax on long term capital gains in equities will hurt middle class savings and the gains touted from the Goods and Services Tax implementation are yet to be visible as it has too many complexities.“No tax system should be complex. It leads to people finding ways to duck it. It has to be simple. One thing is sure, the income we had expected from the GST is nowhere to be found. We are not reaching the set target,” he said.“People opted for mutual funds for investments and now the government is taxing it. There is no clarity in policy, it keeps on changing. I don’t understand what they are trying to achieve,” said Mr Desai.last_img read more

Big change in society through prohibition: Nitish

first_imgChief Minister Nitish Kumar on Thursday said that there has been “a big change” in society through total ban on liquor, which was not being seen by those opposing it.“Life of lakhs of people have been changed through prohibition…go and ask poor people in villages, especially women how ban on liquor has brought big changes in their lives,” said Mr. Kumar while addressing a gathering on the occasion of the second anniversary of prohibition day at Adhiveshan Bhawan in Patna.He took on the Opposition and said: “They only express concern over those who have been arrested and sent to jail for either drinking liquor or being involved in illegal trade of it.”Mr. Kumar also scoffed at media reports over the number of people sent to jail under the new prohibition and excise Act. “They [media reports] say over one lakh people have been sent to jail under the excise and prohibition law…I would like to ask them what is the capacity of jails in Bihar?…If the capacity of all the district jails of the State are put together, even then there would not be space to imprison such a large number of people,” he said. Some media reports, earlier, had said that over 1.20 lakh people have been sent to jail in Bihar in the last two years under the new stringent excise and prohibition law.Mr. Kumar, however, furnished some data on it and said: “From April 2016 to 31 March 2018, a total of 6,82,570 raids were conducted, 1,05,954 cases were registered and 1,27,489 people were arrested, but only 8,123 people are in jail as per records on March 12, 2018”.He further added that “among those arrested, altogether 801 are from outside the State”. Besides, he added, “11,70,865 litres of country made liquor and 17,13,780 litres of Indian Made Foreign Liquor have been seized in the State in last two years”.‘The poor benefited’“It’s the poor people, people from SC, ST and OBC class who have been benefited the most from prohibition,” said Mr. Kumar, while asserting that “let the people, who are in a very small number, oppose prohibition in the State, but I’ll keep it effectively enforced”. He also quoted Mahatma Gandhi’s words opposing liquor. Earlier, the Bihar government had declared that there has been reduction in crime by 18.5%, dacoity by 24% and kidnapping by 28% ever since the liquor ban was enforced in the State.last_img read more

Major reshuffle in Chhattisgarh bureaucracy ahead of elections

first_imgIn a major reshuffle ahead of assembly elections this year, eighteen IAS officers have been transferred in Chhattisgarh. The transfer orders were issued on Sunday night.The district collectors of six districts have been changed and three districts have got new Zila Parishad Chief Executive Officers in this reshuffle.The district collector of Balrampur district Avinash Sharan has been transferred as the district collector to Kabirdham district which is Chhattisgarh chief minister Raman Singh’s home district. Former Sukma district collector Niraj Bansod, who was currently working as Kabirdham collector, has been transferred to Jangir Champa district in North Chhattisgarh.IAS officer Janak Patel has been posted as the district collector of Baloda-Bajar district. Mahadev Kawre has been shifted to Bemetara district as the collector and Doman Singh has been sent to Mungeli district as the collector.IAS officer Hiralal Nayak, who was working as the additional collector of Maoist insurgency-hit Bastar district, has been posted as the collector of Balrampur district.Young IAS officer Prabhat Malik has been named as the new CEO of Bastar Zila Parishad. IAS officer Gaurav Kumar and Ritesh Agarwal were transferred as the Zila Parishad CEOs of Dhmatari and Durg district respectively.This is the second reshuffle of IAS officers in Chhattisgarh in last six months and it assumes significance as Chhattisgarh is considered a state run by bureaucrats.last_img read more

NSCN-IM slams Rijiju over remarks on talks

first_imgThe Isak-Muivah faction of the National Socialist Council of Nagaland on Monday lashed out at Union Minister of State for Home Kiren Rijiju for “vitiating the atmosphere of negotiations” by saying the issue of sovereignty has been dropped from the talks agenda.Mr. Rijiju on Saturday said the Naga peace process was nearing a solution with the NSCN-IM having dropped some issues such as sovereignty of Naga-inhabited areas.On Tuesday, Mr. Rijiju denied making such a statement. “I have not used any words except that territorial integrity of all States would be maintained,” he said. “At no point of the negotiation have both the parties ignored important political issues, and the concocted statement of Mr. Rijiju that NSCN has dropped the stand of the Nagas on their sovereign right is a figment of his imagination,” the NSCN-IM said in a statement.“When the dialogue is progressing at the level of the Prime Minister, Mr. Rijiju has no business to talk on political issues he is ignorant about,” the NSCN-IM said. It advised Mr. Rijiju to refrain from making irresponsible statements at this juncture.last_img read more

After rebuke from Rahul Gandhi, C.P. Joshi tweets apology

first_imgFollowing a public rebuke from Congress president Rahul Gandhi, senior Congress leader from Rajasthan C.P. Joshi apologised for his controversial remarks made at a public meeting at Sema village in Nathdawra.Video footage of the meeting showed him as saying that “only Brahmins know and can talk about Hinduism”. Mr. Gandhi disapproved of the comment in a tweet, saying Mr. Joshi’s remarks did not reflect, and were contrary to, the ideals of the Congress.“C.P. Joshi’s remark is contrary to the Congress party’s ideals. Party leaders should not give any statement that hurts any segment of society,” he said. “While respecting the Congress party’s principles and the sentiments of party workers, I am sure Joshiji will realise his mistake. He should express regret over his remarks,” the Congress chief tweeted.Following the rebuke, Mr. Joshi tweeted an apology.BJP spokesperson Sudhanshu Trivedi said in Jaipur that Mr. Joshi had insulted Hindu traditions and was taking forward the Congress agenda of dividing Hindu seers on the basis of caste.last_img read more

Sena attacks Maharashtra govt for farm distress

first_imgExpressing distress over the falling prices of onions in Maharashtra, the Shiv Sena on Friday asked why farmers cannot be given their due if the state government can implement the 7th Pay Commission. The Sena, in an editorial in party mouthpiece Saamana, pointed out that onion farmers in Aurangabad’s Vaijapur Agricultural Produce Marketing Committee (APMC) were getting as little as 20 paise per kg for their produce.“These onions could become bombs and explode,” the Sena editorial warned. It said the true picture of the condition of farmers cultivating onions, cotton and tomatoes was yet to come before the government, adding that the government would not have “thrown assurances” at them if it knew their plight. The Sena said all that the farmers were demanding was money to cover the cost of production.“But the government distances itself from the demands citing lack of funds and other technical problems. The government borrows Rs 500 crore from Shri Saibaba Sansthan Trust in Shirdi for its pending projects. It also can spare two to five hundred crore for the bullet train project,” it said.last_img read more

Goa CM discharged from hospital

first_imgAiling Goa Chief Minister Manohar Parrikar was on Tuesday evening discharged from Goa Medical College & Hospital (GMC), where he was being treated since Saturday for complications arising from advanced pancreatic cancer. Mr. Parrikar was admitted on Saturday following internal bleeding. An official statement said, “Chief Minister has been discharged from GMC. His health parameters are stable. Will continue with his treatment at home.” He was taken to his private residence after his discharge.As news of the pre-dawn attacks came in on Tuesday, a tweet by @Manoharparrikar said, “I salute the #IndianAirForce for its daring operations. It is a testimony to the IAF’s unparalleled strike capabilities. The new India under Shri. @narendramodi ji believes in its forces, & makes no compromise on terrorism & national security.”last_img read more

Rohingya trio deported to Myanmar

first_imgThree Rohingya, including a woman, were deported to Myanmar via Moreh in Manipur on Thursday. The three had been caught in 2013 for illegally entering Assam.”We coordinated with Manipur police and Myanmar authorities for the deportation of the Rohingya people,” Sader Ali, Deputy Superintendent of Police in Assam’s Sonitpur district, said on Friday.The three were lodged at a detention camp for foreigners in Sonitpur district headquarters Tezpur. They belonged to the family of five other Rohingya who had been deported to Myanmar on January 3. Mr Ali was in charge of the deportation process that involved Moreh’s sub-divisional police officer Binoy Chongtham.The deported trio was identified as Emam Hussain, 55, Mohammed Saresh, 20, and Rafiqa Begin, 18. Police said they were from a village under Bathidung police station in Myanmar.last_img read more

ScienceShot: Meet ‘Wrinkly Tooth,’ the Earliest Rodentlike Creature

first_imgRodents are among the most successful animals on Earth, making up some 40% of all mammalian species. But long before there were rats and mice, there were equally successful mammals that looked a lot like them. These were the multituberculates, so-called because their cheek teeth featured multiple cusps, or tubercles. Reporting online today in Science, researchers reveal what they claim is the earliest known multituberculate, a nearly complete skeleton dated to 160 million years ago, from the fossil-rich Tiaojishan Formation in Northeast China. The team has named the new critter (artist’s reconstruction above) Rugosodon eurasiaticus. (Rugosodon in Latin means “wrinkly tooth,” referring to the highly wrinkled and creased surfaces of its molars, and eurasiaticus refers to the team’s conclusions that the specimen resembles somewhat younger ones found in both Europe and Asia.) It is about 17 centimeters long, the size of a rat. It also sports numerous features that explain how multituberculates, many of which ate both plants and crawly things such as worms and spiders—and which were capable of burrowing, jumping, and climbing trees—got off to such a good evolutionary start. Not only did Rugosodon have teeth that would have been very good at shearing plant material, but its ankles were also capable of rotating in wide angles, making it very agile. These features probably contributed to the more than 100-million-year-existence of multituberculates, a success story that ended only after true rodents independently arose about 60 million years ago and apparently outcompeted them to extinction.last_img read more

Novartis’s Japan Unit Faces Criminal Probe for Hypertension Drug Marketing

first_imgJapan’s Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare today asked public prosecutors to investigate a possible criminal violation of drug marketing laws by the Japan subsidiary of the giant Swiss pharmaceutical firm Novartis. The ministry says the company may have exaggerated the benefits of its hypertension drug valsartan.Last July, Novartis Pharma admitted that a former employee created a conflict of interest by participating in clinical studies of valsartan, sold under the trade name Diovan, conducted by five Japanese medical schools while concealing his affiliation with the company. Several of the studies were retracted after investigations by the medical schools and the health ministry turned up data manipulation that skewed results. Novartis Pharma advertisements had pointed to the studies as showing that the use of Diovan reduced the risk of heart attack and stroke in hypertension patients better than alternative medications. According to Japanese press reports, potential fines could be just $20,000, but there is a small chance executives could face jail sentences.   Also today, Novartis Japan posted a statement in Japanese on its website acknowledging the investigation and apologizing “to patients, their families, health care workers and citizens for causing great worry and trouble.” As in previous statements, Novartis pledged to fully cooperate with authorities but did not admit any wrongdoing.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more

New Hope for Asia’s Embattled Forests

first_imgProspects for tackling deforestation in Asia are looking brighter. At the Forests Asia Summit 2014, held in Jakarta on Monday and Tuesday, a high-profile lineup of government officials, business executives, environmentalists, community activists and scientists reached a surprising common ground on the need to address deforestation.”I actually have a sense of hope,” says Scott Poynton, founder and executive director of The Forest Trust, a Swiss nonprofit organization that helps companies run responsible supply chains. It was clear that all parties are “moving toward solutions” for deforestation and related issues, adds Peter Holmgren, director general of the Center for International Forestry Research in Bogor, Indonesia.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Forests covered just over 4 billion hectares, or about 31% of Earth’s land area, in 2010, according to the most recent Global Forest Resource Assessment undertaken by the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization. FAO’s study found that globally, the rate of deforestation had declined to about 13 million hectares lost annually from 2000 to 2010 compared with 16 million hectares lost each year of the previous decade. In some countries, notably China, aggressive afforestation efforts have led to an increase in forested areas. In South and Southeast Asia, forest area decreased 2.4 million hectares per year between 1990 and 2000, but only by 677,000 hectares per year between 2000 and 2010. Despite what the report calls “considerable progress,” in reducing forest loss, deforestation “continues at an alarmingly high rate in many countries.”The summit did not result in any new agreements. But it comes on the heels of “a series of commitments” by big corporations to deal with environmental and social issues, says Glenn Hurowitz, managing director of Climate Advisers, a Washington, D.C.-based consulting firm. In recent months, he says, companies involved in palm oil, forestry, and consumer products have agreed to strive to eliminate activities that contribute to deforestation. Such promises might be greeted with cynicism. However, Holmgren and Hurowitz point out, consumer expectations of greater attention to environmental issues are driving the corporate response. In many cases, large corporations “are setting the bar higher than the laws and regulations in Indonesia,” says Yuyun Indradi, who follows forest issues for Greenpeace Southeast Asia from Jakarta.”We have to see if the commitments are realized on the ground,” Holmgren says. Poynton adds that tax and development policies in Indonesia and elsewhere inadvertently incentivize deforestation, though he thinks some government officials now recognize the problem.last_img read more

Top stories: Weather on Mars, a stem cell debacle, and a doggy love hormone

first_imgResearch teams clash over too-similar MERS papersA great story can be told again and again. But scientists working on the deadly Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) virus are puzzled by two papers appearing in separate journals that not only tell the same story, but also are based on data from the very same patient in Saudi Arabia.Greenland is getting darkerSign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Greenland’s white snow is getting darker, and impurities like dust, soot, and microorganisms are likely to blame. What’s the big deal? Darker snow melts faster: The impurities could be responsible for melting 27 billion tonnes of ice a year and could easily add 2 cm to the projections of sea level rise by 2100.Japanese stem cell debacle could bring down RIKEN centerShutting down RIKEN, the research center at the heart of the unfolding STAP scientific scandal may be necessary to prevent a recurrence of research misconduct, according to a new report. A RIKEN review committee found lax oversight and a failure on the part of senior authors of the papers behind the scandal and surmised that a drive to produce groundbreaking results led to publishing results prematurely.No wind chill on MarsThe environment on Mars isn’t as harsh as we thought. Although it is cold—the average martian temperature is about –63°C—it feels a lot warmer because the planet has no wind chill. It turns out that a summer afternoon on Mars actually feels a lot like your average winter day in southern England or Minneapolis.Rats regret bad decisionsScientists used to think only humans felt regret. Now, a new study reveals that rats are also capable of pining over what might have been. Researchers say the insight could help improve animal models of bad decisions, such as drug or alcohol use that leads to addiction.’Love hormone’ has same effect on humans and dogsThe “love hormone” oxytocin makes humans more trusting, cooperative, and generous. But how does it affect other animals? New research shows that it makes dogs friendlier, too. The study supports the idea that oxytocin is key to forming close social relationships—even when those are with unrelated individuals or different species.last_img read more

Dogs glean information from each other’s barks

first_imgA dog’s bark may sound like nothing but noise, but it encodes important information. In 2005, scientists showed that people can tell whether a dog is lonely, happy, or aggressive just by listening to his bark. Now, the same group has shown that dogs themselves distinguish between the barks of pooches they’re familiar with and the barks of strangers and respond differently to each. The team tested pet dogs’ reactions to barks by playing back recorded barks of a familiar and unfamiliar dog. The recordings were made in two different settings: when the pooch was alone, and when he was barking at a stranger at his home’s fence. When the test dogs heard a strange dog barking, they stayed closer to and for a longer period of time at their home’s gate than when they heard the bark of a familiar dog. But when they heard an unknown and lonely dog barking, they stayed close to their house and away from the gate, the team reports this month in Applied Animal Behaviour Science. They also moved closer toward their house when they heard a familiar dog’s barks, and they barked more often in response to a strange dog barking. Dogs, the scientists conclude from this first study of pet dogs barking in their natural environment (their owners’ homes), do indeed pay attention to and glean detailed information from their fellows’ barks.For more on man’s best friend, see the Science News team’s latest coverage of doggy science.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more

Microsoft mogul to create new cell science center

first_imgEleven years after he established an institute dedicated to mapping the brain, Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen is announcing a sequel: the Allen Institute for Cell Science. Just like its predecessor, the new institute will be seeded with $100 million from Allen himself; will embrace big-team science, bringing together cell biologists, mathematicians, computational biologists, and other specialists; and will seek to decipher a world whose complexity is still largely uncharted.The buzz began just over a year ago, but the details weren’t revealed until today. At a press conference in downtown Philadelphia this afternoon, during the annual meeting of the American Society for Cell Biology, the scientists guiding the new institute spoke of it as science fiction come true.  “We are embarking on an amazing journey,” declared Rick Horwitz, the new institute’s executive director, who until recently was a professor of cell biology at the University of Virginia.The venture will be housed in the same Seattle, Washington, building as the Allen Institute for Brain Science, and initial plans call for hiring 75 scientists to fill it. Its goal is grand: Decode the human cell by deciphering how its various pieces of machinery work together and how they are perturbed by gene mutations, drugs, and other forces. Ultimately, its leaders want to be able to predict how specific cells will behave in different circumstances.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)But the institute’s first project will be narrower. Researchers plan to study how induced pluripotent stem cells transform into heart muscle and epithelial cells and compare and contrast how these transformations occur. The data and models generated will be made publicly available.The $100 million infusion will last 5 years, until 2020, said Allan Jones, the CEO of the Allen Institute for Brain Science, who was also present for the big announcement. And after that? Jones hinted that the new institute would likely follow a trajectory similar to his own, which in 2012 received another $300 million from Allen, while supplementing this philanthropy with federal grants.Allen didn’t appear at today’s unveiling. But in response to a reporter’s question about why he was captivated by the cell, Jones pointed to its intricate machinery, which, from 10,000 feet up, isn’t all that different than the brain’s. “The issue of complexity is one” Allen keeps coming back to, he said.last_img read more

Podcast: Sodium explosions, human-Neandertal mating, and more

first_imgWhy does sodium explode in water? Where and when did humans and Neandertals interbreed? And does childhood neglect erode the brain? Science’s Online News Editor David Grimm chats about these stories and more with Susanne Bard. Plus, John Bohannon discusses the growing rift between mathematicians and the National Security Agency following Edward Snowden’s 2013 revelations of massive eavesdropping on U.S. citizens.last_img