Tony Becca: Give Jamaicans a chance!

first_img Team strikes Oral Tracey is a man of my own order, or almost, or, at least, when he writes in The Gleaner on Tuesdays. I only wish there were more like him, or rather, there were more people who would speak out as he quite often does. As I have been doing for years now, Tracey has been calling for a change in the attitude of the Jamaica Football Federation, or of its president, Horace Burrell, in travelling to England and elsewhere and turning over every stone in order to find a footballer who has a Jamaican connection and who he can convince to come and play for Jamaica. According to Tracey, Burrell is wasting his time, and, again, I congratulate him on saying that. According to Tracey, and me, who believes that he is also wasting the people’s money, Burrell would be better served if he concentrates on building Jamaica’s football and improving Jamaica’s footballers, especially the young footballers. Instead of flying all over the place to tell the foreign-based players about Jamaica, to encourage the foreign-based players to visit Jamaica for a while, a few days at a time, and to represent Jamaica, instead of bringing in these players, paying for their flight “home” and their hotel bills, Burrell could spend a little money, some of Jamaica’s money, on local football, on grounds, etcetera, etcetera. Rome was not built in a day, and neither will the quality of Jamaica’s football, if it is ever to be built at all. Jamaica made it to the World Cup in 1998, however, and Jamaica can make it back again. In around 1993, Burrell turned up at Jamaica House, at a meeting of the National Sports Council, and pleaded for help, for some money, to try and assist Jamaica’s efforts to reach the World Cup finals in 1998. He spoke about the basic skills of young Jamaicans, and about the young footballers’ dream. The meeting turned him down, and he left in disappointment. Prime Minister P. J. Patterson then spoke to the meeting about really considering Burrell’s request. He asked them if they would rob the poor young men of Jamaica of the chance of trying for the World Cup and of fulfilling their dreams. And it is worse to hear that the “team was on strike yesterday over money”, the day before a match. And it is worse, remembering that none of these boys play for Manchester United, Chelsea, Arsenal, Manchester City, Tottenham Hotspurs, or Liverpool, and that none of them is Raheem Sterling or Daniel Sturridge. Although Wes Morgan is from Leicester, most of them are from small clubs playing in the lower leagues and would never ever be called to play for England. If, by some miracle, that happens, Burrell would spend his time on his knees pleading in vain for them to come “home” and play. Jamaica is a small country, and we should give opportunities to those who travel while seeking a better life. But their presence on the national team should be limited in numbers, and it should be limited to those who want to play, those who seek to play, and those who are good enough to play. If we follow Tracey’s plea, Jamaica may not make it in 2018, and Jamaica may not even make it 2022 or in 2026. The only hope for Jamaica, however, to make it after that is to offer opportunities to our young, talented local footballers, get them together regularly, play them in the Premier League, and let them express themselves on the way to fulfilling their dreams. On top of it all, Jamaica cannot afford to bring “home” strangers to play “home” matches at the National Stadium, to be in the bargaining room arguing over money when the players should be preparing to play, especially when they are average players treated with kid gloves and are lucky that there is a place like Jamaica, with a body like the JFF, and a president like Burrell. Government assistance The meeting then voted for the government to assist. The government went beyond the call of duty, and the result is history. A group of Jamaicans, including young Ricardo ‘Bibi’ Gardner, plus a small set of English-based Jamaicans, Robbie Earle, Paul Hall, Deon Burton, and Fitzroy Sinclair, worked and trained under the guidance of coach RenÈ Simies of Brazil and assistant coach Carl Brown of Jamaica, went to the World Cup, and also beat Japan. That was 1998, and although it is no disgrace, Jamaica have not been back to the World Cup. They, however, recently went to Japan and were easily and comprehensively beaten. What has happened to the Burrell, who in 1993 or thereabouts spoke so emotionally about the young Jamaican footballers? Is this another Burrell? Jamaica’s football has been kept alive, mostly by Red Stripe. The parish leagues have been kept going, mostly by the Captain’s money, but local football itself has been nowhere since 1998. The “national” team, the squad, is made up of almost all foreigners, sometimes with a token local player or two, sometimes they play reasonably well, and sometimes, most times, they play badly. The “national” team, the playing eleven, sometimes has no born and bred Jamaican in it. It is sad to hear commentators, Jamaican commentators, saying that “number 20 plays a pass to number 22”, while describing play, or the newspapers writing that “the Jamaica players arrived yesterday for the home match against El Salvador at the National Stadium”.last_img read more

All eyes on Calabar’s Taylor

first_imgATHLETES from the Corporate Area will be hoping to cement their spots for the finals of the Digicel Grand Prix Athletics Championship later this month, when they compete in the Digicel/Anthrick Corporate Area Development Meet at the Usain Bolt/UWI Stadium today, starting at 10 a.m.There will be seven Grand Prix finals. These are the boys’ Class Two discus, boys’ classes One and Two long jump, girls’ classes One and Two high jump, and the boys’ and girls’ Open 4×400 metres. The other Grand Prix events are Class One boys’ discus final, classes One and Two boys’ high jump finals, boys’ 800 metres, girls’ discus, girls’ long jump, girls’ 800 metres, girls’ discus, along with the 200 and 400 metres.Today’s meet will be the penultimate one for athletes in the Corporate Area to book their individual spots for the grand final, which will culminate next Saturday with the G.C. Foster Classics.They will get their final opportunity on Saturday at the Digicel Camperdown Classics inside the National Stadium.Beside seeking top spot in the Grand Prix events, athletes will be hoping to help their schools gain valuable points, as the top teams overall in the male and female categories will walk away with a cash prize of $250,000, and the top two individuals will carry points towards the finals.BATTLE ROYALThe top-three boys’ teams at last year’s ISSA Boys and Girls’ Championships – defending champions Calabar High, Kingston College (KC) and Jamaica College (JC) – are expected to have another battle royal, while it should also be close among the females, as Corporate Area champions for the past eight years, Wolmer’s Girls, will be severely tested by the likes of a vastly improved Excelsior High, Camperdown High, St Andrew High, Immaculate Conception High, and Convent of Mercy Academy ‘Alpha’, which have all been in terrific form this season.Again, all eyes will be on Calabar High’s Christopher Taylor, who is the leader in the boys’ Under-18 400 metres Grand Prix event. Taylor, despite just going through the motions last Saturday at the Youngster Goldsmith Meet, was still able to clock 47.18 seconds. His teammate, Brandon Heath, who was second overall with 49.66 seconds, will be hoping to maintain that position. Jamaica College’s Romario Mickel and Excelsior High’s Mikel Clarke will also be looking to make an impact.Calabar are also ahead in the Grand Prix Class Two 100 metres, where the outstanding Dejour Russell is the leader in the Under-18 category after winning the event last Saturday in 10.89 seconds. His teammate, Tyreke Wilson, was also under 11 seconds on the day, after finishing second in 10.97. Wolmer’s Boys’ Malik Shepard, who was third in 11.05, and his teammate, Xavier Nairne, who was fourth in 11.07, are also seeking spots among the top two.KC’S JHEVAUGHN MATHERSONKingston College’s Jhevaughn Matherson, who won his heat in 10.69 seconds in Class One, will be hoping for a faster time today to move ahead of Calabar High’s Xavier Angus, who was first overall with 10.66.Among the females, Alpha’s Kiara Grant was the fastest Class Three athlete in the 100 metres among Corporate Area athletes last Saturday, winning in 11.74 seconds to lead the Under-17 section. Wolmer’s Girls’ Kellian Kelly is second overall, after finishing fourth overall in Class Two in 12.05 seconds.last_img read more

Basketball wants its own house

first_imgHaving a facility of its own to manage and host national camps, plus getting better financial aid would be on top of the wish list of basketball president, Mark Broomfield, when the new Government takes office.Broomfield says if associations, especially basketball, have a facility to call their own, it would greatly improve preparation for international tournaments and enhance programmes to develop local talent.”We want a facility to manage and operate on our own. For any sport, give them (associations) facilities, so they can develop programmes. As it is now, we don’t own any facilities. The minister of sports for the first time gave the national (basketball) team the opportunity to train indoors when we are preparing for international tournaments, so we can use the indoor centre free of cost.”The next step would be to have our own facility, where we have the keys and can have any training programmes and have access to it. We want also a facility that can be managed by the association, so we can have training when preparing for international tournaments, especially the youth programme.”If you have a home, you can have a camp and have access to courts. We have one that is used for netball, we want one for basketball as a home allows us to do things that you are not able to do if you don’t have a camp, and for basketball, we want our own facility,” he reasoned.Broomfield added that financial assistance could also be improved.”One of the improvements I would like to see is greater financial support for the associations, especially basketball. But I would love to see them continue the improvement of sport as it relates to government intervention,” he said.last_img read more